50 Important Spanish Phrases for Getting to Know a Native (2022)

50 Important Spanish Phrases for Getting to Know a Native (1)

By 50 Important Spanish Phrases for Getting to Know a Native (2)Stevie D. Last updated:

Feel your heart pounding?

Palms cold and sweaty?

Butterflies in your stomach?

Chances are, you’re about to meet somebody for the first time.

And to make things worse, you don’t even speak his/her language.

Well, more accurately, you’re learning to speakthatlanguage.

It doesn’t matter whether you’re meeting via Skype, at a coffee shop or at a restaurant.

What matters is that you wanna make a good first impression.

Well actually, you just don’t wanna make a fool out of yourself.

You’ve probably never done anything like this before and feel like you’ve bitten off more than you can chew.

Lucky for you, you’re reading this.

In this post, I’ll give you 50 of the most important Spanish words and phrases you’ll need for a first meeting. This is all about the “best hits” of Spanish conversation. We’re gonna trace the whole meeting from the initial greetings to the final goodbyes.

But first, let me tell you why, as a language learner, you should put yourself at the mercy of native Spanish speakers.

Download: This blog post is available as a convenient and portable PDF that you can take anywhere. Click here to get a copy. (Download)

Why It’s Important to Talk to Native Speakers

The Written Form Is Not Enough

There aren’t enough grammar books in the world to teach you Spanish. There’s no vocabulary list long enough to teach you how to speak.

The written form is short on so many things. If you wanna learn how to write in Spanish, stopping at books may be okay. But speaking Spanish? You actually have to open your mouth, move your tongue and let the mistakes come out. You simply cannot read your way to fluency.

(Video) Spanish Conversation for Beginners | 70 Basic Spanish Phrases To Know

This phenomenon is actually quite common: Aperson can write perfect English–everything is just pristine. All the words are in their proper form and in perfect agreement. You just know that this person learned the language in school. But when you talk to them, something’s off. They can hardly enunciate a string of English words correctly.

The reason?

They never practiced the language. They are fluent writers but not fluent speakers.

It’s Good Practice

There’s nothing like practicing and embarrassing yourself in front of a native speaker. Because if there’s anyone who can correct even the tiniest stray accent, it’s someone who’s been hearing it all his life.

A subtle misplaced word or sound will ring loudly in his ears, and he can bring your attention to it.

Having a language partner who’s also trying to learn Spanish is good (it’s better than not having anyone), but a native speaker will be much better in bringing you up to speed. He can help you place an adjective or suggest words to say something a little differently.

He’ll find your mistakes cute, and won’t feel threatened at all when you make serious gains in his native tongue.

Native Speakers Can Teach You a Thing or Two

Finally, a native speaker will teach you more than his language. He’ll let you in on the unspoken rules that govern Spanish. He’ll make context come alive for you, and tell you when to use the formal and informal forms of communication.

For example, the singular “you” in Spanish has twoforms: “tú” and usted.”

“Tú” is the informal “you” and is used to show familiarity and closeness. It’s appropriate to use for friends, colleagues, kids and pets.

“Usted” is the formal “you” and is used to show respect. It’s appropriate for elders, people in positions of authority and strangers. (In our context here, we’ll use theusted” form, as this is the first meeting and we don’t want to come off too familiar.)

Without the guidance of a native speaker, it will be very difficult to divine the nuances in Spanish.

Beyond that, a native speaker can show you the rich Spanish culture and traditions. Language is a reflection of the folks who use it. Their journey as a people is reflected in the language.

So if you want to really understand Spanish, don’t just talk to a native speaker. Befriend one, cultivate long-term and deep friendships. It’ll open a world far beyond what the grammarbooks can tell.

Relationships, of course, start with a first meeting. So let’s proceed to the words and phrases you should be bringing into that interaction.

Getting to Know You: 50 Important Spanish Phrases to Break Out for Small Talk

1. The GreetingsPhase

Before we get to the actual greetings, let me remind you that the Spanish culture is a cheek-kissing culture. So if you’re gonna fully immerse yourself in it, you better be prepared to kiss and get kissed on the cheek often, platonically. It doesn’t mean that person hasthe hots for you, it’s just the way they greet each other. It comes with the territory, and there’s no way around it.

Since this is a first time meeting, a firm handshake will suffice for the time being. But if the native speaker dives in for a cheek, take his/her cue and do likewise.

(Video) Learn 50 important Spanish Phrases for daily life. Spanish Lesson.

Here are the common Spanish greetings:

  • ¡Hola! (Hello!)
  • Buenos días.(Good morning.)
  • Buenas tardes.(Good afternoon.)
  • Buenas noches.(Good night.)

Just so you know, you can get away with saying “Buenas tardes” as late as 7 p.m.

And as you will soon discover, time is altogether a different proposition for Spanish-speaking cultures. They have lunch around 2 p.m. or even later. So if you’re set on having a 12 p.m. lunch, you might be sitting in a restaurant alone for a very long time before your companion makes his entrance. But don’t worry, all will be forgiven once you hear him charm you in Spanish.

After the greetings, you proceed with the names. If you had plans and were waiting to meet someone, you’d probably know their name already. So when you meet the person, you could say, “¿Es usted John?”(Are you John?)

To which he could reply with a vibrant “¡Sí!”

But if this isn’t the case, you should politely ask for his name byusing the formal “you” (usted) as discussed above. Because if you have to ask for aname, it onlyshows you’re unfamiliar with the person, and there’s nothing weird about that.

  • ¿Cómo se llama? (What is your name?)

This is literally translated as “What do you call yourself?” To answer, say:

  • Me llamo _____. (My name is _____.)

After s/he introduces himself/herself and gives you aname, say:

  • Mucho gusto. (Nice to meet you.)

This phrase is a standard response and means “much pleasure.” You’re telling the other person that you’re pleased to meet him/her.

  • ¿Cómo está usted? (How are you?)

Now you’re being asked how you’re feeling. There are many ways to answer this, depending of course on how you’re feeling:

  • bien (good)
  • muy bien (very good)
  • así-así(so-so)
  • mal (bad)
  • muy mal (very bad)

But since this is a first meeting, you probably don’t have to actually say that you’re feeling bad because your sinus is acting up again. Not a good way to start a friendship. This next one is the standard answer:

  • Estoy bien. (I’m fine.)
  • ¿Y usted? (And you?)

It’s always polite to ask about how the other person is doing. It shows that you’re concerned and interested in them as well. So always throw back the reciprocal “¿Y usted?

The golden rule is that one should never be late, especially for a first meeting. But late or not, one of you is bound to be at the meeting place first. So if you were the secondone to arrive, you can say:

  • Siento llegar tarde! (Sorry I’m late!)

If the other person is late, get him to relax by saying:

  • ¡No pasa nada! (It’s nothing!)

2.The Small Talk Phase

All cultures have this. It’s just polite to have a brief, nonchalant chitchat before going into the nitty-gritty of things. And this is for a good reason.

Imagine you’re meeting someone for the first time. You’re already seated at the table, waiting for him. A few minutes later, he steps inside the restaurant, all drenched because it was raining outside. He walks to your table, introduces himself and is very apologetic. He’s still catching his breath and wiping his face when you suddenly ask, “So, what are your hobbies?”

If you were asked this as you were taking your seat, wouldn’t you rather just brave the rain outside?

(Video) 50 common Spanish Phrases. Learn Spoken Spanish.

Small talk allows people to slowly get into the groove. It relaxes them and warms them up.

It shows the other person that you’re well-versed in social conventions, and more importantly, that you have no sinister agenda. To show courtesy, bring alongyour pleases and thank yous. They’re the tools for your charm initiative. Use them liberally when you’re meeting somebody for the first time. It sets the dynamic properly between two strangers. Of course, even when you’re with close friends and family, you should always pepper your interactions with courtesy. It just shows class.

Courtesy Goes a Long Way

Here are some Spanish expressions of courtesy:

  • Por favor (Please)

Literally, this phrasemeans “for favor.” You’re asking the other person to dosomething for you. As in, “Do me a favor.”

  • Gracias. (Thank you.)
  • De nada.(You’re welcome.)

Literally, “De nada” translates as “of nothing.” It’s like saying “it’s nothing” or “not at all.” You’re telling the other person thatit’s no big deal.

  • Lo siento. (Sorry.)
  • Discúlpeme. (Excuse me.)

When You Don’t Understand

Chances are, you won’t be able to catch everything a native speaker throws your way. He or shemight be speaking so fast, half of it just flies by you. In cases like this, have these expressions ready:

  • No entiendo. (I don’t understand.)
  • Hable más despacio, por favor. (Please speak slower.)
  • ¿Podría repetir, por favor? (Could you repeat that, please?)

3.The Getting-to-know-you Phase

This next phase is really a natural continuation of small talk. But this time, you are engaged in the very reason of why you’re having a first meeting. And that’s to get to know the other person. What are they like?

A big part of this is asking and answering questions. Here are common questions you could be ask or might like to ask during a typical first meeting.

Your “Question” Words & Phrases

  • ¿Qué? (What?)
  • ¿A qué se dedica?(What is your job?)

This last phrase is literally asking, “To what do you dedicate yourself?” Well, assuming that you’re totally dedicated to your job. When answering, be honest. Don’t make stuff up just so you sound interesting. If you’re an ornithologist, just say so. Who knows, your new friendmight be a bird-watcher.

  • ¿Dónde? (Where?)

You will most definitely be asked a ¿Dónde?”question.

  • ¿Dónde vive? (Where do you live?)
  • ¿De dónde es? (Where are you from?)
  • ¿Dónde está el baño?(Where is the bathroom?)

It’s just good sense to have this last one ready for when you really need to go. You can’t think straight, much less listen to a native speaker, when all you’re hearing is toilet bowl flushes.

  • ¿Cuántos? (How many?)
  • ¿Cuántos hermanos tiene? (How many siblings do you have?)
  • ¿Cuántos años tiene usted? (How old are you?)
  • ¿Qué tipo de música le gusta?(What kind of music do you like?)
  • ¿Cuál? (Which?)
  • ¿Cuáles son sus pasatiempos?(Which/What are your hobbies?)

“Pasatiempos” is formed by combining “pasar” (to spend/to pass) and “tiempo” (time). So literally, it means “pastime.”

  • ¿Cuál es su película favorita?(Which/What is your favorite movie?)

“Cuál”(which)is used instead of qué”(what) because cuál”denotes a selection or choice. In the example above, you are asking something to the effect of “Among all the movies, which one is your favorite?”

  • ¿Cuál es su comida favorita? (Which/What is your favorite food?)

Still remember the lessons on Spanish genders? We use “favorita” here because it refers to “comida”(food), which ends in the letter “a.” Had we asked for his favorite book (“libro”), we would have used “favorito” because “libro” ends in the letter “o.”

(Video) 50 Phrases Every Spanish Beginner Must Know

  • ¿Cuándo? (When?)
  • ¿Quién? (Who?)
  • ¿Cómo? (How?)

After these questions, of course you would want to give youranswers or listen forthem.

So here are your most common ones.

Your “Answer” Words and Phrases

  • Sí. (Yes.)
  • No. (No.)
  • (Yo) tengo treinta años. (I am 30 years old.)
  • (Yo) vivo en Estados Unidos. (I live in the United States.)
  • (Yo) soy de Nueva York. (I am from New York.)

Notice that Yo is in parentheses? It’s unnecessary becausesoy,” “tengo” and vivoare first person conjugations. Their partner has to be Yo (I). It can’t be anything else.In this case, “Yo” is implied. So if somebody asks what your profession is, you can say:

  • Soy ingeniero. (I’m an engineer.)
  • Me gusta bailar. (I like to dance.)
  • Me gusta comer frutas. (I like to eat fruit.)

Make sure you don’t confuse Me gusta and Me gustaría.

  • Me gusta(I like)
  • Me gustaría(I would like)

You can use gustaría”to signify an intention or to politely ask for something. For example, when ordering at a restaurant:

  • Me gustaría un poco devino. (I would like somewine.)

Speaking of liking, here’s a way to discuss a more specific preference:

  • Mi película favorita es “Ghost.”(My favorite movie is “Ghost.”)

Oh, and please don’t hold it against anybody if their favorite movie is “Ghost.” To each his own. That Patrick Swayze is a sexy, sexy man.

4.The Concluding Phase

Hopefully, by this point, you’ve realized just how cool your new acquaintance is, and you’re interested in hanging out some more.

For Spanish-speaking cultures, saying goodbye is an elaborate dance. You don’t just abruptly disappear into oblivion. You transition into your goodbyes. So perhaps you can hint at your exit by asking for the time or mentioning things you need to do later. Do this about 15 minutes before you absolutely have to go. As always, make a graceful exit by wishing each other well, with the promise of seeing each other in the future.

Keep these handy expressions in the bag:

  • ¿Qué hora es? (What time is it?)
  • Me tengo que ir. (I have to go.)
  • Hasta luego.(See you later.)
  • Hasta pronto. (See you soon.)
  • Hasta mañana.(See you tomorrow.)
  • Cuídese. (Take care.)
  • Adiós. (Goodbye.)

Don’t say “Hasta la vista.”Contrary to what popular culture might have you believe, you probably wouldn’t use that unless you’re Arnie saying goodbye at a “Terminator” convention.

So there you go. Your first meeting in fourphases.

Remember, don’t be somebody you’re not. Don’t pretend like you can out-Spanish the other person. Make themandatory mistakes,laugh and be open about your linguistic journey. Ask for help. More often than not, they’ll be glad to give you some pointers.

Accept that your Spanish won’t be totally smooth the first time. But with patience and persistence, you can make it smooth as silk.

Download: This blog post is available as a convenient and portable PDF that you can take anywhere. Click here to get a copy. (Download)

FAQs

What are some Spanish sentence starters? ›

Ten of the Most Important Spanish Sentence Starters and Filler Words
  • Mira. Definition: look/ look here. ...
  • Este (only in Latin America) Definition: um/ah. ...
  • Bueno. Definition: well. ...
  • Pues. Definition: well, but more informal. ...
  • Es decir que. Definition: I mean. ...
  • Viste (only in Argentinean Spanish) ...
  • La verdad es que. ...
  • Tipo/Como.

How can I impress a Spanish person? ›

Eight Harmless Yet Flirty Spanish Phrases To Compliment And Impress Someone
  1. Eres lindo/linda. ...
  2. Me gusta tu sonrisa. ...
  3. Te ves hermosa / guapo esta noche. ...
  4. ¡Tú eres chistoso! ...
  5. Perdí mi número. ...
  6. ¡Te pareces mucho a mi próximo/a novio/a! ...
  7. Si Cristóbal Colón te viera, diría: ¡Santa María, qué Pinta tiene esta Niña!

What are 3 greetings in Spanish? ›

1.1 Greetings in Spanish
  • Hola - Hello.
  • Buenos días - Good morning.
  • Buenas tardes - Good afternoon.
  • Buenas noches - Good evening.

What are 5 easy Spanish words? ›

Basic Spanish Words
  • Hola = Hello.
  • Adiós = Goodbye.
  • Por favor = Please.
  • Gracias = Thank you.
  • Lo siento = Sorry.
  • Salud = Bless you (after someone sneezes)
  • Sí = Yes.
  • No = No.

What is the easiest Spanish word? ›

Basic Spanish Words

These basic words will also aid you in connecting sentences and ideas as you begin to learn more Spanish words. Hola (Hello) Adios (Goodbye) Gracias (Thank you) Por favor (Please)

What are the 300 most common words in Spanish? ›

300 Words Every Spanish Beginner Must Know - YouTube

What is Cómo estás? ›

¿Cómo estás? (How are you?) It`s a question that they certainly ask you frequently when you come to Spain.

What are some cool Spanish words? ›

20 Coolest Spanish Words
  • tranquilo – Cool, quiet, composed, laid back, chilled out. ...
  • escuincle – Kid, brat.
  • chamba – A Mexican word that means “work”. ...
  • órale – Mexican word that means “OK”, “alright” or “go for it!”
  • dale – Argentine version of órale.
  • escopeta – A shotgun.
  • genio – Literally means “genius”.

What are Spanish filler words? ›

Fillers in Spanish are called muletillas, which literally translates to little crutches. They are words or phrases that native Spanish speakers often use to start sentences or express ideas. They can also help you gain some extra time to gather your thoughts.

How many words do you need to be fluent in Spanish? ›

If you think about native-level fluency, you'll need to master between 20,000 and 40,000 words, and as you can see the margin is quite large. If you want to have a basic conversation, experts say that you'll just need around 3,000 words.

How do you memorize Spanish words quickly? ›

7 Easy Tricks for Memorizing Spanish Vocabulary
  1. Return to Your List of New Words Often. ...
  2. Learn Cognates. ...
  3. Understand How to Use Words. ...
  4. Use Flashcards. ...
  5. Create Pictures in Your Mind. ...
  6. Learn Song Lyrics. ...
  7. Practice Your Spanish Vocabulary.
18 Feb 2015

Can I become fluent in Spanish in 3 months? ›

Lewis is the author of the new book "Fluent in 3 Months: How Anyone at Any Age Can Learn to Speak Any Language from Anywhere in the World." The title pretty much says it all. He believes — strongly — that with the correct approach and enough practice, anyone can master a foreign language in as little as three months.

What do you call a beautiful Spanish woman? ›

Hermoso/Hermosa – “Gorgeous”

Hermoso has a similar relationship with hermosura, which means “beauty”. You can also say una hermosura to mean “a beautiful woman”.

How do you reply to de nada? ›

Don't Say “De Nada” [15 Ways to Say You're Welcome in Spanish]

What to say to a Spanish girl to turn her on? ›

16 Romantic Spanish phrases to say to your lover:
  • 1.Te quiero. I love you.
  • Te amo. I love you.
  • Estoy enamorado(a) de ti. I am in love with you.
  • Te quiero con toda mi alma. I love you with all of my soul.
  • Eres el amor de mi vida. ...
  • Cada día te quiero más. ...
  • Eres mi todo. ...
  • 13.Quiero estar contigo para siempre.

How do I reply to Ola? ›

If in passing someone says “hola!” to you, it would acceptable to reply: “como estas?” Bonito. Pronounced: bone-eat-oh. This word means “beautiful.” It could simply be used anytime you see something that you like.

Is De nada a greeting? ›

You're welcome – De nada.

How do you respond to Mucho Gusto? ›

Mucho Gusto

It can be used in the beginning and the end of the conversation. Instead of saying “adios” to someone who you just met, you can simply say “mucho gusto!” And if you are wondering how to respond to “mucho gusto”, the best answer is “igualmente” o “mucho gusto también”.

What does De nada means? ›

Definition of de nada

: of nothing : you're welcome.

What is the most common word in Spain? ›

que that

What are some big Spanish words? ›

Learn to pronounce 8 of the longest words in Spanish
  • Esternocleidomastoideo (22 letters) ...
  • Interdisciplinariedad (21 letters) ...
  • Internacionalización (20 letters): ...
  • Desvergonzadamente (18 letters) ...
  • Desconsoladamente (17 letters) ...
  • Electrodoméstico (16 letters) ...
  • Paralelepípedo (14 letters) ...
  • Caleidoscopio: (13 letters)
29 Oct 2015

How do you introduce yourself in Spanish? ›

Spanish Introductions

The most common way to introduce yourself in Spanish is to say "Me llamo" followed by your name. Alternatives include "Mi nombre es" or "Soy" followed by your name. "Hola" can be used for either "hi" or "hello."

What are 5 Spanish words commonly used in English? ›

More Spanish Words In English
  • bonanza — “prosperity”
  • cafeteria — from cafetería (“coffee store”)
  • incommunicado — estar incomunicado (“to be isolated”)
  • jade — from piedra de ijada (“stone of flank”)
  • nada — “nothing”
  • platinum — from platino (little silver)
  • pronto — “hurry up!”
11 Aug 2021

What are some hard Spanish words? ›

Tricks to Tackle the Top 10 Hardest Spanish Words to Pronounce
  • Impermeabilizante (Waterproof)
  • Ferrocarril (Railroad)
  • Desarrolladores (Developers)
  • Difícil, Fácil (Difficult, Easy)
  • Actualmente, Desafortunadamente, Probablemente (Currently, Unfortunately, Probably)
  • Verde, Tarde (Green, Afternoon)
  • Estadística (Statistics)
29 Aug 2022

How do you say no in Mexican? ›

12 DIFFERENT WAYS to SAY NO in SPANISH - YouTube

What is the easiest language to learn? ›

15 of the easiest languages to learn for English speakers -...
  • Frisian. Frisian is thought to be one of the languages most closely related to English, and therefore also the easiest for English-speakers to pick up. ...
  • Dutch. ...
  • Norwegian. ...
  • Spanish. ...
  • Portuguese. ...
  • Italian. ...
  • French. ...
  • Swedish.
24 Oct 2021

How long does it take to become fluent in Spanish? ›

If you start out as a beginner and spend an average of 1 hour per day working on your Spanish, you should able to reach conversational fluency within 8 – 12 months. That translates to roughly 250 – 350 hours of time spent.

What is the meaning of Comista? ›

[komuˈnista ] Word forms: comunista, masculine plural comunisti, feminine plural comuniste. adjective, masculine and feminine noun. communist.

What are buenos dias? ›

: good morning : hello.

How do you say como esta? ›

How to pronounce '¿Cómo estás?' (How are you?) in Spanish?

What is a beautiful Spanish word? ›

Bello/a – Beautiful

Bello/a means “beautiful” or “lovely.” It's a bit formal, especially in Spain Spanish (Castellano). A closely related noun is la belleza, which means “beauty.” This is a romantic and common word to call a person “beautiful” in Spanish. ¡Te ves muy bella! You look very pretty!

How do Puerto Ricans say cool? ›

Nítido. This just means “cool,” so if you like something, Está nítido (It's cool) works fine.

What do Spanish people say instead of UM? ›

O sea, literally translated as “that is,” is basically the Spanish equivalent of our English “um,” “ah,” “I mean”—words that, no matter how intelligent a speaker you fancy yourself, you probably rely on more than you realize.

Why do Spanish people say entonces? ›

'Then' Meaning 'Therefore' or 'in That Case'

Entonces is a common translation for "therefore" or phrases with similar meanings, although you can sometimes use various phrases of causation as well.

What does are pues mean in Spanish? ›

Pues is used by almost all speakers as a verbal filler word. It's a favorite word for people to say when they are trying to buy time in between sentences. As a filler word, pues in Spanish most commonly translates to “well” but it can have other meanings too. In English we might say “ummmm…” “so…” or “then…”

What is the hardest language to speak in the world? ›

1. Mandarin. As mentioned before, Mandarin is unanimously considered the most difficult language to master in the world! Spoken by over a billion people in the world, the language can be extremely difficult for people whose native languages use the Latin writing system.

Which language has the shortest words? ›

Language with the fewest words: Taki Taki (also called Sranan), 340 words. Taki Taki is an English-based Creole spoken by 120,000 in the South American country of Suriname.

Is 2000 words enough to speak Spanish? ›

How many words do you need to speak Spanish? According to some research, around 2,000 words are enough for a learner to understand more than 80% of the conversation. As for the written language, have in mind that sentences are more complex, and vocabulary is diverse.

Does listening to Spanish while sleeping help? ›

As listening to Spanish in your sleep can improve your memory retention of vocabularies. Moreover, you can also save energy by learning Spanish while you're sleeping. Using this technique, you can make learning the words a little easier.

How long should I use duolingo per day? ›

You don't need to spend hours on Duolingo each day. However, you must put a reasonable amount of time into learning. If you log in to complete one lesson and sign out as soon as you've reached 10XP, you won't get very far. To optimize your learning, aim to spend between 15 and 30 minutes on the app each day.

Is Spanish easier than English? ›

Spanish. Social media informalIy tells me there's an overwhelming consensus: English is WAY harder for Spanish-speakers to learn.

What are the 300 most common words in Spanish? ›

300 Words Every Spanish Beginner Must Know - YouTube

How do you respond to Como estas? ›

How do you answer if someone asks you, "¿Cómo estás?" or "How are you?"? The standard answer is probably "Bien" ("Fine") or "Muy bien" ("Very good"). Of course, both of those responses are often expanded: "Muy bien, gracias.

How do you say hi in Spanish slang? ›

¡Hola, hola! Hey! ¡Oye!

What are 5 easy Spanish words? ›

Basic Spanish Words
  • Hola = Hello.
  • Adiós = Goodbye.
  • Por favor = Please.
  • Gracias = Thank you.
  • Lo siento = Sorry.
  • Salud = Bless you (after someone sneezes)
  • Sí = Yes.
  • No = No.

How many words do you need to know in Spanish to be fluent? ›

If you think about native-level fluency, you'll need to master between 20,000 and 40,000 words, and as you can see the margin is quite large. If you want to have a basic conversation, experts say that you'll just need around 3,000 words.

Can I become fluent in Spanish in 3 months? ›

Lewis is the author of the new book "Fluent in 3 Months: How Anyone at Any Age Can Learn to Speak Any Language from Anywhere in the World." The title pretty much says it all. He believes — strongly — that with the correct approach and enough practice, anyone can master a foreign language in as little as three months.

What are some cool Spanish words? ›

20 Coolest Spanish Words
  • tranquilo – Cool, quiet, composed, laid back, chilled out. ...
  • escuincle – Kid, brat.
  • chamba – A Mexican word that means “work”. ...
  • órale – Mexican word that means “OK”, “alright” or “go for it!”
  • dale – Argentine version of órale.
  • escopeta – A shotgun.
  • genio – Literally means “genius”.

What is Cómo estás? ›

¿Cómo estás? (How are you?) It`s a question that they certainly ask you frequently when you come to Spain.

How do I reply to Ola? ›

If in passing someone says “hola!” to you, it would acceptable to reply: “como estas?” Bonito. Pronounced: bone-eat-oh. This word means “beautiful.” It could simply be used anytime you see something that you like.

How do I reply to Buenos dias? ›

In short – the best (and easiest) response to 'buenos días' is a simple 'buenos días' in return! 'Hola, buenos días', 'buen día', 'igualmente' and 'como está' are also excellent responses!

How do you respond to Mucho Gusto? ›

Mucho Gusto

It can be used in the beginning and the end of the conversation. Instead of saying “adios” to someone who you just met, you can simply say “mucho gusto!” And if you are wondering how to respond to “mucho gusto”, the best answer is “igualmente” o “mucho gusto también”.

What do we call no in Spanish? ›

Nop – Nope. To say “no” in Spanish in a super informal way, use this expression. It works the same way as the English “nope” but once again, make it a short /o/ instead of the English diphthong. It's okay to use with friends, but if you say it to your teacher, for example, you might sound a bit impolite.

What do you say after Hola? ›

You can simply use hola (hello or hi) on its own. You can also use buenos días (good morning), buenas tardes (good afternoon or good evening – provided it's still light) and buenas noches (good evening – once it's dark).

How do Spaniards greet each other? ›

Spaniards move onto a first name basis very quickly, even in professional settings. The common verbal greeting is “Buenos dias” (Good day), “Buenas tardes” (Good afternoon) or “Buenas noches” (Good evening/night) depending on the time of day. People may also say “¿Como está?” (How are you).

Videos

1. 50 Useful Intermediate Spanish Phrases
(Spanish Corriente)
2. 50 Spanish Transition Words to Make You Sound Like a Native Speaker | Spanish Grammar
(Spanish Academy TV)
3. 50 Spanish Chunks that Native Speakers use EVERY single day!
(Spring Spanish - Learn Spanish with Chunks)
4. Learn Spanish in 30 minutes: The 100 Spanish phrases you need to know!
(Butterfly Spanish)
5. Advanced Spanish Conversation Practice: 50 Phrases to use in a Conversation in Spanish
(Hola Spanish)
6. 50 Spanish Phrases to Use in a Conversation
(Learn Spanish with SpanishPod101.com)

You might also like

Latest Posts

Article information

Author: Delena Feil

Last Updated: 06/08/2022

Views: 5883

Rating: 4.4 / 5 (65 voted)

Reviews: 80% of readers found this page helpful

Author information

Name: Delena Feil

Birthday: 1998-08-29

Address: 747 Lubowitz Run, Sidmouth, HI 90646-5543

Phone: +99513241752844

Job: Design Supervisor

Hobby: Digital arts, Lacemaking, Air sports, Running, Scouting, Shooting, Puzzles

Introduction: My name is Delena Feil, I am a clean, splendid, calm, fancy, jolly, bright, faithful person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.